Author Archives: Mafalda Stasi

M87MC – Media Audiences (2015-16)

This module examines the nature of ‘the audience’ as it has been conceptualised historically, and explores the relationship between audiences and texts. The module will  position audience studies within the disciplines of media and cultural studies; critically examine theories and conceptualisations of ‘the audience’; understand how we can investigate audiences; understand how specific audiences engage with media texts.

Syllabus 

Date Topic
Mon 18 Jan Introduction
Mon 25 Jan What are “audiences”?
Mon 1 Feb Methodological approaches
Mon 8 Feb Identity and difference
Mon 15 Feb Adoring audiences
Mon 22 Feb Gendered audiences
Mon 29 Feb Classed audiences
Mon 7 Mar Racialised audiences
Mon 14 Mar Sexed audiences
Mon 21 Mar Recap
STUDY BREAK
Mon 18 Apr Tutorials
Mon 25 Apr Tutorials
Mon 2 May  Due Date

All sessions take place 6-8pm in room ET130 unless otherwise specified.

Click on the links for materials, instructions, and coursework. In general, please make sure you refer to all posted materials including lecture slides, bibliography, and various case study materials, and that you check the module blog weekly.

Module assessment 

A 3.000 words academic essay – due date  Mon 2 May

Identify a specific community or group of people and analyse in detail the ways they engage with  media texts, and how such relationships structure their community, their identity and their behaviour. Are these people an audience? What makes them into an audience, and in which specific ways? How do they make sense of their affective and relational identities?

You should refer to the examples of ethnographic studies discussed in class, and to the theories associated with them. You should also demonstrate awareness of your disciplinary and methodological approach.

Pass requirements: The module mark must be at least 40%. Students who hand in all the required coursework but who do not achieve a pass are entitled a resit. The resit mark is capped at 40%, but passing your resit is the only way to progress to the next year and gain your degree. It is important to remember that people who do not hand in their coursework will fail without the right to resit, which means they will not be able to complete their course and achieve their degree. Always hand something in! 

A resit brief will be made available after module marks are released.

Academic honesty statement

Resources

Select Bibliography

Indicative list of readings: more texts will be added in the course of the module.

  • Hall, S. (1980) “Encoding/decoding.” In Hall, S. et al., eds., Culture, Media, Language, London: Hutchinson. pp. 128–38.
  • Miller, T. (2001) “What it Is and What it Isn’t: Introducing… Cultural Studies.” in A Companion to Cultural Studies. Oxford: Blackwell. pp.1-19.

202MC bibliography: 2014-15

Ahmed, S. (2002) ‘Racialised Bodies,’ in M.Evans and E.Lee (eds) Real Bodies. London:  Palgrave.

Andreouli, E. (2013) “Identity and Acculturation: The Case of Naturalised Citizens in Britain.” Culture & Psychology 19 (20): 165-183.

Garner, S. (2012) “A Moral Economy of Whiteness: Behaviours, Belonging and Britishness.” Ethnicities 12 (4): 445-464.

Gilroy, P. (1987) There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack. London: Routledge. (Introduction)

Gilroy, P. (1982) “The Myth of Black Criminality.The Socialist Register pp.47-56. Hall, S. (2011) “The Neoliberal Revolution.” Cultural Studies 25(6): 705-728. Hall, S. (1978) Policing the Crisis: Mugging, the State, and Law and Order. London: Macmillan. Haylett, C. (2001) “Illegitimate subjects? Abject whites, neoliberal modernisation, and middle-class multiculturalism.Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 19 (3): 351-370. Hayward, K. and Yar, M. (2006) “The ‘chav’ phenomenon: Consumption, media and the construction of a new underclass.Crime Media Culture 2 (1): 9-28.

Hussain, Y. and Bagguley, P. (2005) “Citizenship, Ethnicity and Identity: British Pakistanis after the 2001 ‘Riots’.” Sociology 9(3): 407–425.

Michael, L. (2009) “Securing civic relations in the multicultural city.” in Citizenship, Security and Democracy: Muslim Engagement with the West (W. Krause, ed.), pp. 164-186. London: International Institute of Islamic Thought.

Moore, P. and Forkert, K. (2014) “Class and Panic in British Immigration.” Capital & Class 38 (3): 497-505.

Reay, D. et al. (2007) ” ‘A Darker Shade of Pale?’ Whiteness,the Middle Classes and Multi-Ethnic Inner City Schooling.”Sociology 41(6): 1041–1060.

Reay, D. and Lucey, H. (2000) ” ‘I really don’t like it here but I don’t want to be anywhere else’: children and inner city council estates.Antipode 32 (4): 410-428.

Rose, N. (1999) Governing the Soul: The Shaping of the Private Self. New York: Free Associations Books.

Skeggs, B. (2005) “The Making of Class and Gender through Visualizing Moral Subject Formation.” Sociology 39: 965-982. Tyler, I. (2013) “The Abject Politics of British Citizenship.” In Revolting Subjects: Social Abjection and Resistance in Neoliberal Britain. London: Zed Books. pp.48-74.

Sketches of VE Day from 70 years ago – visual culture

The Queen, McQueen and pearly queens: 50 years of Britishness – in pictures

Tyler, I. (2013) “Britain and Its Poor.” In Revolting Subjects: Social Abjection and Resistance in Neoliberal Britain. London: Zed Books. pp.154-178.

Tyler, I. (2010) “Designed to fail: a biopolitics of British Citizenship. Citizenship Studies 14(1): 61-74.

Tyler, I. (2008) ” ‘Chav Mum, Chav Scum’: class disgust in contemporary Britain.Feminist Media Studies 8 (1): 17-34.

Watts, P. and Stenson, K. (1998) ” ‘It’s a Bit Dodgy Around Here’: Safety, Danger, Ethnicity and Young People’s Usage of Public Spaces.” in Skelton, T. and Valentine, G. Eds. Cool Places: Geographies of Youth Cultures. London: Routledge. pp. 249-267. Webster, C. (2003) “Race, Space and Fear: imagined geographies of racism, crime, violence and disorder in Northern England.Capital & Class 80: 95-122. Yilmaz, F. (2012) “Right-wing Hegemony and Immigration: How the Populist Far-Right Achieved Hegemony through the Immigration Debate in Europe.” Current Sociology 60 (3): 368-381.

Other resources

202MC – 2013-14

Bibliography on Neoliberal citizenships:

Ahmed, S. (2002) ‘Racialised Bodies,’ in M.Evans and E.Lee (eds) Real Bodies. London:  Palgrave.

Dardot, P. and Laval, C. (2014) The New Way of the World: On Neoliberal Society. London: Verso.

Gilroy, P. (1987) There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack. London: Routledge.

Gilroy, P. (1982) “The Myth of Black Criminality.The Socialist Register pp.47-56. Gulliver, K. (2013) “Thatcher’s legacy: her role in today’s housing crisis.The Guardian 17 April 2013. Hall, S. (2011) “The Neoliberal Revolution.” Cultural Studies 25(6): 705-728. Hall, S. (1978) Policing the Crisis: Mugging, the State, and Law and Order. London: Macmillan. Harvey, D. (2007) “Neoliberalism as Creative Destruction.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 610: 21-44. Harvey, D. (2005) A Brief History of Neoliberalism. Oxford: Oxford UP. Haylett, C. (2001) “Illegitimate subjects? Abject whites, neoliberal modernisation, and middle-class multiculturalism.Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 19 (3): 351-370. Hayward, K. and Yar, M. (2006) “The ‘chav’ phenomenon: Consumption, media and the construction of a new underclass.Crime Media Culture 2 (1): 9-28.

Hussain, Y. and Bagguley, P.(2005) “Citizenship, Ethnicity and Identity: British Pakistanis after the 2001 ‘Riots’.” Sociology 9(3): 407–425.

Littler, J. (2013) “Meritocracy as Plutocracy: The Marketising of ‘Equality’ Under Neoliberalism.New Formations 80: 52-72.

Michael, L. (2009) “Securing civic relations in the multicultural city.” in Citizenship, Security and Democracy: Muslim Engagement with the West (W. Krause, ed.), pp. 164-186. London: International Institute of Islamic Thought.

Reay, D. et al. (2007) ” ‘A Darker Shade of Pale?’ Whiteness,the Middle Classes and Multi-Ethnic Inner City Schooling.”Sociology 41(6): 1041–1060.

Reay, D. and Lucey, H. (2000) ” ‘I really don’t like it here but I don’t want to be anywhere else’: children and inner city council estates.Antipode 32 (4): 410-428.

Rose, N. (2000) “Government and Control.British Journal of Criminology 40(2): 321-339.

Rose, N. (1999) Governing the Soul: The Shaping of the Private Self. New York: Free Associations Books. Skeggs, B. (2005) “The Making of Class and Gender through Visualizing Moral Subject Formation.” Sociology 39: 965-982. Skeggs, B. (2005) “The Re-Branding of Class: Propertising Culture”, in F. Devine et al. (eds) Rethinking Class: Cultures, Identities and Lifestyles. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan. Skeggs, B. (1997) Formations of Class and Gender. London: Sage. Skelton, T. and Valentine, G. Eds. (1998) Cool Places: Geographies of Youth Cultures. London: Routledge. Tyler, I. (2013) “The Abject Politics of British Citizenship.” In Revolting Subjects: Social Abjection and Resistance in Neoliberal Britain. London: Zed Books. pp.48-74.

Tyler, I. (2013) “Britain and Its Poor.” In Revolting Subjects: Social Abjection and Resistance in Neoliberal Britain. London: Zed Books. pp.154-178.

Tyler, I. (2010) “Designed to fail: a biopolitics of British Citizenship. Citizenship Studies 14(1): 61-74.

Tyler, I. (2008) ” ‘Chav Mum, Chav Scum’: class disgust in contemporary Britain.Feminist Media Studies 8 (1): 17-34.

Watts, P. and Stenson, K. (1998) ” ‘It’s a Bit Dodgy Around Here’: Safety, Danger, Ethnicity and Young People’s Usage of Public Spaces.” in Skelton, T. and Valentine, G. Eds. Cool Places: Geographies of Youth Cultures. London: Routledge. pp. 249-267. Webster, C. (2003) “Race, Space and Fear: imagined geographies of racism, crime, violence and disorder in Northern England.Capital & Class 80: 95-122.

Fan fiction and fan communities in the age of the Internet

Links forthcoming

Coppa, F. (2006a). “A brief history of media fandom.” In K. Hellekson & K. Busse, Eds., Fan fiction and fan communities in the age of the Internet.Jefferson, NC: McFarland. (pp. 41-59).

Derecho, A. (2006) “Archontic literature: A definition, a history, and several theories of fan fiction.” In K. Hellekson & K. Busse, Eds., Fan fiction and fan communities in the age of the Internet. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. (pp. 61–78).

Stasi, M. (2006) “The Toy Soldiers from Leeds.” In K. Hellekson & K. Busse, Eds., Fan fiction and fan communities in the age of the Internet. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. (pp.  115-133).

Woledge, E. (2006) “Intimatopia: Genre Intersections between Slash and the Mainstream.” In K. Hellekson & K. Busse, Eds., Fan fiction and fan communities in the age of the Internet. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. (pp.  115-133).

________________________________________

Cicioni, M. (1998) “Male pair-bonds and female desire in fan slash writing.” In: Harris C, Alexander  A (Eds) Theorizing Fandom: Fans, Subculture and Identity. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 153-177.

205MC – Introduction

Today’s lecture introduced the module’s structure and provided an overview of its contents. It also outlined the module’s learning objectives, and explained the final assessment in detail. The seminar gave an overview of the available resources, and assigned a task for next week. Students were also divided into smaller working groups.

Task for next week. What is Film Noir? Each group to come prepared next week with:

  • A definition of what the genre is (its history and origin, etc.)
  • A list of key stylistic and narrative features that define it (eg lighting techniques, character types, storylines, etc)
  • At least two clips from films described as noir and to be able to identify the features in each clip that make the films noir.

As a reminder, we will focus on a series of media texts on the overall theme of crime. The following are the main texts we will discuss: if possible, you should familiarise yourself with them.

Office Hours

By apppointment The best way to see me is by appointment: email me and I will set aside time for you. Come prepared: bring any work you want to discuss, and prepare your questions in advance. Please note that I will not feedback on material sent via email: you need to come see me in person if you want to discuss your work.

For the months of March and April (off term) I will receive by appointment only

Drop-in During term time, I have weekly office hours set aside where you can drop in. Please make sure you only drop in during the time slots indicated: my other teaching and research commitments mean I cannot be in the office at all times.  Also please keep in mind that if you do not email me to book a slot, you might have to queue.